This perennial climber comes originally from South-America, but has now spread over most of the the warmer parts of the world. It is also known as Madeira or Potato vine. Growers in Europe have this as a collector’s plant in their greenhouse, whereas in the warmer parts of the world, they are trying to get rid of it. In some countries is has even become an invasive weed that is difficult to eradicate, because it is almost impossible to get rid of all the small tubercles. When you dig up the plant, the small tubercles that have formed on the stems fall off very easily.
Cutting the stems and leaving the branches lying around does not help to kill the plant, because there is enough energy left in the stems to produce the small tubers. If you really want to get rid off the plant, you need to burn the stems (make sure you gather up all the tubercles that have fallen off) or poison the plant with Glyphosate. You need to do the latter by scraping the bark and putting the poison on the wound so it will be taken into the plant. A bit harsh, but it is the only way unless you happen to live in a country where the temperatures fall below zero, because they cannot take any frost.
Anredera can grow to up to 9 metres long and has bright green heart-shaped leaves. In the autumn, it produces large numbers of small fragrant flowers in racemes. It can grow in semi-shade or full sun and can take a lot of drought. It is propagated mostly by tubercles, rarely by seed. Because it is such a rampant grower, it can be cut back almost to the tuber and it will come back and flower the following year – an ideal beginners plant.

Anredera cordifolia

Anredera cordifolia


 
Anredera cordifolia raceme

Anredera cordifolia raceme


 
Anredera cordifolia tubercle

Anredera cordifolia tubercle

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