This is one of a number of new species from Madagascar that has been brought into cultivation over the last few years. It has a creeping stem which will elongate and climb into shrubs when ready to flower. There are two colour forms, the white one seen here and a green one which is more common. It requires a winter temperature of 15°C to do well. It is not difficult to cultivate provided it is kept shaded in the summer.
It can be propagated from cuttings or, although rarely available, from seed. Seed can germinate within 24 hours which tends to be common in Asclepidaceae anyway. The stems of petignatii are similar to those of C. armandii and C. simoneae; some people would call it “like dead braches”, but don’t be fooled; they are obviously not dead. The vegatative stems are normally thick, but when they start to flower, they elongate and become very thin.
Please note that the leaves you see in the picture below are from a different species; the petignatii was growing in amongst it.

A photo of the green variety can be seen in Art Vogel’s album.

Ceropegia petignatii

Ceropegia petignatii


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