Hoya


Before 1994, few Hoya species from Sulawesi were in collections, but in that year a group of Hoya enthousiasts spent three weeks collecting Hoya material on the island. About seventy numbers were collected, but as they were not in flower, some species were collected several times. The plants were brought back to Holland, grown on and brought into flower. One of the species collected was at the time given the number 114, later changed to 8864, and only determined as Hoya pallilimba by Ruurd van Donkelaar and David Kleijn in 2001 (‘Taxonomy and ecology of the Genus Hoya’ in Blumea, 46/3, pp. 457-483). The pallilimba was found by the Ranu River in the Morowali reserve and is a species that grows in association with ants. The ants (genus Tetramorium) take the seed into holes in branches to store as a food supply; the seeds that are not eaten will germinate and grow from the hole. The plant is not solely dependent on the ants; seeds that drop into leaf litter in the fork of branches will also germinate.
Pallilimba is a hanging species that is not very free-flowering. It also has to be reasonably large before it will flower. The plant itself when not in flower is very similar to two other species on the island, Hoya brevialata and Hoya myrmecopa. It is a lot easier to tell them apart, when the plants are in flower. Brevialata has much larger flowers and can be red or white. Myrmecopa has flowers that hang down as buds but which will stand upright when open. Pallilimba flowers are smaller and always reddish in colour.
The plant is reasonably easy in cultivation and can reach a length of 1.50 mtr. It is best grown in a hanging pot to give the stems enough room. It is easily propagated from cuttings; in the summer they will root in about 10-12 weeks. The plant requires higher temperatures than many of the other hoyas, around 20°C minimum.

Hoya pallilimba GPS8864

Hoya pallilimba GPS8864

This Sulawesian species was collected in 1994 between Tentena and Kolonodale. It is very similar to H. paulshirleyi GPS 8845 and to GPS 8865 and GPS 8870, but the flowers are much lighter. It was growing high up in a fairly large tree which made it very difficult to collect. The only way we could get at it, was to try and knock off a few pieces with a branch. It was one of the first plants we collected that flowered in cultivation and it flowers freely and at a young age. Without flowers, this species and GPS 8845 are impossible to tell apart.
It is a very easy plant to propagate by cuttings, unlike the GPS 8845, and will root in about 6-8 weeks. The plant can take a reasonable amount of sun and the leaves will turn reddish if kept in the sun giving a nice effect; they will stay green if kept in the shade. It is a sort that requires warmth to do well, 20°C and over. It can also take a lot of dryness before it dies. So far, I have not seen any seedpods on this species, despite the fact that there are lots of moths in the greenhouse that should have done the trick.

 

Hoya sp. Sulawesi GPS 8860

Hoya sp. Sulawesi GPS 8860


 

This is a very popular plant in cultivation, because it is very easy to grow and flowers regularly throughout the year with cream-coloured flowers. The flowers are highly scented to attract moths for pollination. It is a suitable plant for hanging baskets where it will grow to 1-2 metres. It can also be grown on a trellis, but it has to be fastened up. It can best be grown in half shade, but it will tolerate some sun. Lacunosa has many variations in leaves and flowers and hence a lot of cultivar names are used for the same species.
The plant originally comes from Java, Malaysia and Thailand and therefore likes a lot of warmth (at least 20°C) to do well. It does well in the ordinary living room as long as you keep it well-watered. It is very easy to propagate from cuttings and also by seed as long as moths have access to the plant.

Hoya lacunosa

Hoya lacunosa

This plant was collected in Tentena, Sulawesi in 1994 and is not found outside this Indonesian island. We collected it as the sixth species on the first day of our trip. It was mistakenly identified at first as Hoya incurvula, but further investigation showed that it was another species. It is a very easy species, because it can be grown in shade or almost full sun. The leaves will turn a reddish colour if the plant is kept in the sun. It flowers very freely and can surprise you with seedpods in the autumn as it is easily pollinated by moths. The species GPS 8836 is a white-flowered one.
A botanical description can be found in D. Kleijn & R. van Donkelaar, “Taxonomy and Ecology of the Genus Hoya (Ascepiadaceae) in Central Sulawesi” in Blumea 46 (2001), p. 467.

 

Hoya brevialata GPS 8836

Hoya brevialata GPS 8836

This is a large-leaved hanging species which must reach a reasonable size before producing the yellow flowers in the spring.

I have two distinct variations in my collection: GPS 8816 and 8875.
The GPS 8816 was collected on the Lake Poso side of the Tineba mountains in Sulawesi. The GPS 8875 was collected on the other, slighty drier, side of the Tineba mountains on the road to the Bada valley.
Although the plants are very similar, I have found that the GPS 8875 is easier to grow; it grows quicker and roots easier in propagation.
The 8816 was named and described by R. van Donkelaar and D. Kleijn in Blumea, volume 46/3 (2001); the 8875 was named by David Liddle.

 

Hoya minahassae GPS 8875

Hoya minahassae GPS 8875

 

Hoya minahassae GPS 8816

Hoya minahassae GPS 8816

This is of the unnamed species that I have in my collection. It is a climbing species which climbs to the top of the greenhouse where it will flower, so grab a ladder if you want to see them. It can take plenty of heat and light. It is a fairly easy species to grow despite a liking for warm conditions. Do not worry about the drops that will fall down from the flowers; they are nectar drops. Just make sure you do not place the plant above your favourite piece of antique furniture.
The plant is easily propagated by cuttings, preferably taken in July when they will root without bottom heat.

 

Hoya sp. Sarawak GPS 10073

Hoya sp. Sarawak GPS 10073

This species orignates from New Guinea and is allied to H. macgillivrayi and H. onychoides. It is found below 600 meters in the top of trees in the rain forest. It is a rampant grower that can and will produce meters of growth. The large flowers appear all the year round and are a wonderful sight with bunches of up to 20 flowers at a time. The flowers are usually red and among the largest in the genus. In the winter, when the plant is kept at a temperature around 20 degrees C., the flowers are red. In the summer, when the temperatures can reach 40 degrees C., the same clone in the greenhouse will produce white flowers.
Since I like the plant very much, I have adapoted the flower as my logo and you will find it on my website, my blog, my twitter and my business card.

 

Hoya archboldiana

Hoya archboldiana

 

Hoya archboldiana

Hoya archboldiana

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