This is a species from the Philippines. It is a good hanging plant with long, thin leaves. It is somewhat similar to H. kentiana, but without the red-green edge to the leaf. The leaves can be up to 8 cm long and 1.5 cm wide and have a tendency to stand upright. The leaf will also curl lengthways giving it a canoe appearance.
The plant needs to be fairly old before it will flower. The flowers are reddish-orange and reasonably small. For some reason which I cannot explain, it tends not to be attacked by insects such as mealy bug or red spider mite. The plant can take a lot of heat and dryness. On the other hand, it can take a lot of water, but only up to a point. You can overwater it, so be careful.
At the moment, I have rooted and unrooted cuttings available.

 

Hoya loheri

Hoya loheri

This Hoya species comes from the Philippines and is quite rare in the wild. It flowers regularly throughout the year with umbels of about 10-15 flowers, but they are not scented. The plant is easy to propagate by cuttings and can flower the following year. It is an ideal hanging plant, but does need to be kept in the shade. Ordinary room temperature is fine and it can take a lot of water, especially when it is warm. In my greenhouse, a lot of hoyas get pollinated by moths, but I have not seen that on this species. The ones that do get pollinated by the moths tend to have a lot of white in the flower. White flowers usually indicate scent, so presumably that is what attracts the moths? Any thoughts anyone?

 

Hoya davidcummingii

Hoya davidcummingii

Since this morning, GPS numbers have been added to the Hoyas and Dischidias on my webshop. No, GPS does not mean Global Positioning System, but are my initials, Gerard Paul Shirley. They represent my collection numbers and can be used to distinguish between different clones of one species. For instance, the Hoya micrantha has three different GPS numbers, 14, 177 and 188. A different number does not necessarily mean a totally different plant, but it can mean that it comes from a different collection area or from a different collector. The micrantha GPS 177 comes from India and the GPS 188 comes from the Philippines.
All numbers under 10.000 are identical to those used by the IPPS (Institute for Protection and Propagation of Succulent plants), from 10.000 onwards they are my own numbers.
Unnames species are only known by the number, but when they receive a name, the number will stick as well so that you know it is not a different species. As in Hoya sp. GPS 8845 which is now officially Hoya paulshirleyi GPS 8845 (see previous post).

This species comes from Sulawesi; it grows and flowers well and it is one of the first to start flowering in the new season; an ideal plant for the collector. In the wild it clambers through the trees. Assuming you do not have a tree in your greenhouse or house to support it, you can grow it as a hanging plant. The stems will grow to more than a meter, so give it enough space. Because it is very free-flowering, it attracts moths in the greenhouse which is good for pollination. One ‘problem’ if you have more hoyas around, the seedling could very well turn out to be a hybrid as cross-pollination is likely. You always get viable seed, though, which should be sown as soon as possible. Fresh seed will germinate 100 per cent, but if kept too long, the germination is drastically reduced.
The flowers are similar to Hoya brevialata, another species from Sulawesi, but on the 7752 they have a reddish colour while those of brevialate are white.

 

The flower

The flower


 
The seed

The seed

Hoya kerrii GPS 00145
This species is becoming well known now because of the heart-shaped leaf which make it an ideal gift for Valentine’s day. It is sold as the Sweetheart or Valentine’s hoya, but be aware that single leaves – often offered during the Valentine season – will not grow into a plant; it is much better to buy a rooted cutting. There are at least 3 types: a green one, a variegated one and an albo-marginata type. They are found throughout the Indo-China area.
 

Hoya kerrii

Hoya kerrii flower


 
Hoya kerrii leaves

Hoya kerrii leaf

Ted Green and Dale Kloppenburg, two of the people of the group I went to Sulawesi with in 1994, have been so kind as to name one of the hoyas we found there after me. So, it is official, Hoya sp. GPS 8845 is now Hoya paulshirleyi. The article describing the plant can be found in Fraterna, the journal of the International Hoya Association. See here for the Fraterna website.
It is a fast growing species and very easy to flower, producing flowers in abundance. However, the individual flowers last only a day or so. The plant can take half sun, half shade and the leaves will colour red in the sun.

Hoya paulshirleyi

This species comes from the cool mountain forests of Birma. It is a well-known plant in cultivation, but many people still have problems growing this plant. The reason is that they keep it too warm. In the past our houses had the perfect climate for the plant, but since the invasion of the central heating, conditions have deteriorated (all this from the plant’s point of view, not from ours). So, if you want to grow this plant successfully, keep it cool, between 10 and 15° C.

Hoya bella