Ceropegia


This species comes from Kenya, despite its name, and is quite distinctive because of the square stems. It is a tropical species requiring reasonably warm temperatures. It is a clambering species that tends to drape over branches in shrubs. Flowers are not produced often, but are worthwhile waiting for.
It belongs to the larger nilotica group due to the constriction in the base of the flower. It is a very rare plant in cultivation and only infrequently offerred.

 

Ceropegia mozambicensis

Ceropegia mozambicensis

Many people ask me how to grow the cuttings they have ordered from my webshop. Instead of answering each customer individually by mail, I have added a page to the website with cultivation notes for the various groups I sell: Ceropegia, Epiphyllium, Hoya, Impatiens, Rhipsalis and Stapelia. These are general notes on how to treat the cuttings once they arrive and how to grow them on. It is of course not a complete manual with every exception listed, but I thought that these instructions might be helpful.

This is a really nice South-African species. It has thick fleshy roots, annual stems with large leaves that are thick and fleshy. The flowers are produced freely in clusters with only one or two flowers open at any one time which gives it a long flowering period. The stems die back to the rootstock in winter. It can be kept in dry conditions at a temperature of 5 degrees. When the new growth starts, watering can commence again. The colour of the flower can vary.

 

Ceropegia crassifolia

Ceropegia crassifolia

This species originates from South-Africa, is very easy to flower and can be trailed over a trellis. The flowers are fairly large with a distinctive roof. It flowers for most of the year, but more profusely in the autumn. If you are lucky you can even get seed pods and sow the seeds yourself; the seed can germinate within 24 hours, but you cannot keep it for very long.

Ceropegia sandersonii

Ceropegia sandersonii

« Previous Page