This rare species comes from South-Africa, to be more precise, from the mouth of St. John’s River in Natal. It is a tuberous-rooted species and produces annual growth. It can take some frost as long as it is covered over in winter. It can also be grown in a cool greenhouse, but will get straggly if it gets too hot. The risk of spider mite will also be greater if the temperatures gets too high. It will flower from July onwards, no matter where it is grown. The colour of the flower varies from pinkish-white to pink; the most common colour in circulation is the one you see in my picture below.
The plant is propagated either by seed or cuttings; the latter being the most common means of reproduction as there is little seed available, because you need two clones to get seed. The cuttings of this species will produce a tuber unlike, for instance, impatiens tuberosa which does not. The plants grow to about 50-100 cm high in pots and topping will force it to produce side shoots for a nice bushy plant. In the wild, it can grow to 2 metres high.

 

Impatiens flanaganae

Impatiens flanaganae